AIDS is not a death sentence

found this article through Linkmeister:

Historians will look back on our time and see that our civilization spends many millions of dollars educating people about the scourge of H.I.V. and AIDS, which has already taken 25 million lives and could infect 100 million people over the next eight years. But what they will find not so civilized is our failure to treat 95 percent of people with the disease.

Given that medicine can turn AIDS from a death sentence into a chronic illness and reduce mother-to-child transmission, our withholding of treatment will appear to future historians as medieval, like bloodletting.” – William Jefferson Clinton

however you feel about Clinton, he is a brilliant man, and that is a brilliant essay. and it ties in very closely with Dru‘s perspective on that 95% of AIDS victims for whom it is difficult or impossible to receive the medications that would save their lives.

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it’s been quite a day for me. i’ve learned so much. and Dru? that slow internet connection you were talking about? i think it was all the pinging that went on in the blog world today 🙂

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edited to add: more personal stories.
Lee talks about Angela.
Noah talks about Mikee.
note that these are stories, like many of the others told today, in which caring and respect and support made a difference. to quote a very wise woman, “medicine does amazing things. so does talking and understanding. as I stated earlier, the soul needs to be treated as well as the body. there is no success in the treatment if the spirit doesn’t rally.” — thanks for that Joanie.

9 thoughts on “AIDS is not a death sentence

  1. medicine does amazing things. so does talking and understanding. as I stated earlier, the soul needs to be treated as well as the body. there is no success in the treatment if the spirit doesn’t rally.

  2. I personally feel that Bill Clinton was a fine president. Nobody’s perfect, and Bill was faaaaar from perfect, but he was a smart man and I felt better about America when it was under his stewardship than I do now under George W.

  3. it will require nothing short of an all-out assault on this virus to win: medical, societal, scientific, and yes, financial. as Clinton said in his essay, what is the motivation to get tested if it’s just a death sentence? if a positive diagnosis is followed by care and treatment and improved quality and quantity of life, more people would be willing to get tested.

  4. oh, and stacey — i agree with you 100%. i have no problem with Clinton’s peccadillos – the way he handled it was less than optimal, but as a whole i think he was a brilliant man. and a total hottie, but that’s another set of weird dreams right there.

  5. Well, as you might expect, I liked Clinton. Still do. And if you judge a man by the quality of his enemies, he was a giant among pygmies.

    Thanks for the ping, kd!

  6. I’m not a big fan of Clinton — for reasons to numerous to list here — but he did have some clear insight with regards to making appropriate medications available to HIV/AIDS sufferers. I don’t understand why we can’t wrap our heads around that….it’s to OUR BENEFIT to do what we can to alleviate/ameliorate/eradicate this disease in any way we can.

  7. medical practitioners, scientists, all are capable of amazing things. sadly, it is the medical administrators and our leaders that keep them from performing to their fullest.

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